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charley

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hi every body, i will try to tell you my story in installments as i can get it all together.
part one, warning, never ever speak to the police without a solicitor to back you up. that was my first mistake. trusting the police.
a small card had been left in my letterbox. with a written note on the back. would i please phone the p.c. at my convenience , nothing urgent. who would not phone the police immediately? my first question was , " what is the problem"? he replied with , " it is too sensitive to discuss over the phone, can you call in at the police station"?
i answered with " not unless you give me some idea of what it is about". " i am going away touring up scotland with my caravan". his reply was," wait until you come back".
"i demanded to know more about the problem " he then told me that it was " historical sexual abuse" pardon! tell me more". it was to do with someone staying with my family some 38/40 years ago. the penny dropped. we had only fostered on child and i named her. this was my second mistake.
i demanded to meet the p.c. the following day. a bank holiday monday. the police station was closed. the p.c. met me on time outside in the street . we went into the police station and then into a small room. i sat down while the p.c. went to bring me a glass of water. no tea or coffee as it was all locked away. no trust in a police station??
he then collected a lot of items and proceeded to inform me that i was being interviewed under caution. did i want a solicitor? no, why would i wand a solicitor. my third mistake. the interveiw lasted two hours over which the p.c. informed me line by line of the accusations against me . i pleaded that it was all lies and that the social services records would show the truth of the matter. it was so bad that i demanded that my wife and children should also be interveiwed , that the could answer the questions better that i could. that as a long distance lorry driver i was never at home during the week.
within two weeks all my family had been interveiwed , two hours each. with no solicitor present. we were only telling the truth...my fouth mistake.

at my trial the p.c denighed telling me who i had surposed to have sexualy assulted. i was informed that it was my guilty conscience.
did i want to confess?
no, i am here to plead not guilty.

watch for the next episode.

regards pete.
 

Patrick

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sorry to read this Pete, but also good to read it knowing that you won...
and not too dissimilar in the mistake department than me... "only innocents would forgo a solicitor" - hence why we should play that up in court as much as they would always try to play up their stupid ideas of a guilty conscience.

we need to find a way of getting the warnings out to those who need them - but the police are never going to help - and we can only achieve it by warning the entire male population.
 

Matt

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Have been following your story since you joined Pete, and was absolutely over the moon when I read that the jury had at last reached the right verdict. I remember the chilling words of my probation officer, she said "PACE was supposed to keep the police honest but they still don't follow the rules".

If the police believe that you're guilty then bending the rules is considered a small price to pay for "getting a dangerous offender off the streets" - many would agree that is a noble sentiment, reminiscent of heroic cowboys and the no nonsense detectives of old school TV dramas making our streets safer. But ask them how they would feel if it was their son, their brother, father or uncle and the response would almost universally be "they should have a fair trial to prove their innocence" - suddenly not so heroic now.

Looking forward to part 2 Pete, it's never easy to talk about these experiences - I've been through it four times now so I know it well. But talking really does help in the long run. Whenever you feel like bottling it up because it's silly, or boring, or it doesn't matter - just remember that we too have had that thought, followed swiftly by several people telling us that the really silliness was in thinking nobody would understand or care - because here we are, and we're listening.
 
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