Welcome!

By registering with us, you'll be able to discuss, share and private message with other members of our community.

SignUp Now!

Voluntary Police Interviews

chavez121

Member
Unverified
Joined
Nov 9, 2018
Messages
3
Reaction score
3
Status
Wrongfully Convicted
Shaken but not Stirred...

When the Police ask you to attend a voluntary interview - first and foremost you will need to contact a solicitor [Don't leave it until the day of the interview or the day before] The reasons are as follows;
Without legal representation - you have no idea what the Police have - in some cases a very weak case.
Without legal representation - you will not be privileged to advance disclosure [of the complaint or accusation]
Without legal representation - unless you know PACE - the Police will play games with you during the interview [This is when they become expert mind readers and interpret your non-verbal communication [scratching your elbow or looking away etc] that you're hiding something.
Without legal representation - you are at their mercy [ Remember it's not in their interest to prove your innocence]

LEGAL REPRESENTATION IS FREE

Now the voluntary interview itself - the only difference is they haven't got sufficient evidence to arrest you other than that the interview is no different to the one that you would have if you were arrested.

Police interviews are another topic....
 

Patrick

Barman
Staff member
Verified
Joined
Oct 29, 2018
Messages
352
Reaction score
320
Location
Gloucestershire
Status
Acquitted
Back on another site - there was often some debate about the quality of "duty solicitors" and rightly so.
For the frightened novice looking to get their free representation it is worth a bit of explanation as to what a police station duty solicitor is...

firstly - they may or may not actually be a solicitor in the sense that most people think, as in they are lawyers who have passed the law society assessments - but they may have zero experience of court work or representing people in any situation other than at police stations.

The reality is that the quality varies dramatically - a majority of them may be a good representative sample of the local solicitor's firms, fulfilling the duty rota and doing a decent enough job with a hope of recruiting a client. Or they may sit and say nothing and not make any useful suggestions or protective statements - or give the wrong advice because they do not know all the implications - for example, the advice to make a "no comment interview"...unlikely to be the best option, and can be the very worst.

Speak to your solicitor about the idea of making a prepared statement, - at any time during the interview - you and the lawyer can decide to stop and make a written statement, as you hear more of the supposed evidence against you...
and though unusual, this can be more than once or twice too.

This is why it is worth speaking to a solicitor who you have heard good things about - and asking for them to be with you at the police station rather than the gamble of someone from the duty rosta.

The main thing is,
having a solicitor there means you can access the material as listed in Chavez's post
and they will stop (if they are any good) the type of heavy handed repetitive questioning that can have the effect of making you believe you may have done something you have forgotten about, rather than being certain that what they are saying you did is just bullshit allegations.

The other thing to try and do - given that you have had this miraculous chance of going to your first police interview informed rather than as a frightened child...
Is remember that this is YOUR interview, not theirs.
Whatever is recorded in this interview will be used in evidence if charges are brought, and so it is very important that you are in control of it and everything said about you.
You may have enjoyed a good relationship with the police in the past - even worked in partnership with them...
if this is a Rape or serious sexual assault allegation - you are up against a determined and unscrupulous enemy.
Mostly these detectives are full on believers in the myth of all men are rapists and no woman ever lies about rape.
So do not ever think of them as being like the friendly bobby who came around your house when you were burgled that time, they are
NOT
YOUR
FRIENDS.

To ensure your comfort you have the right to request breaks to speak to your lawyer and to have drinks of water.
If they are rephrasing a question just to try and pressure you to give a different answer (and they mostly do this, a lot)
You can state on the record that
"You have asked this question already and I have answered it completely, - do you have any new questions?
This can force them to "think", especially if they make the mistake of rephrasing another stupid question you have already answered, in which case you just say it again.
Modern police stations record these interviews on DVDs, including a wide shot of the group of the table (2 detectives, you + solicitor) and a close up of you. If they are made to look stupid while you stay cool calm and collected - this has to be good for you.

Anything from that interview DVD will be deemed admissible in court - though it is more likely that the police will refer to a transcript - (which will be full of dreadful spelling errors if my own is anything to go by). when you get the chance (if charged) then you can get to study this DVD with your lawyer.

Them holding you in a cell is always a possibility - if they decide to arrest with a view to laying down bail conditions.
If you have never been held in a cell, best to be prepared for a long wait - and as you won't have your phone you will need to try and turn it into a challenge to remain in control - because they are after softening you up.

I demanded some food, vegetarian, ( just to make them work harder!) and while it was crap - it gave me a vital sense of having some power and control. I also demanded a phone call - which I didn't get until after my interview, but then I had already been so stupid as to say I didn't want a lawyer as I was entirely innocent. - a mistake that could have cost me.

More to come?
all comments based on your own experiences welcomed!
 

chavez121

Member
Unverified
Joined
Nov 9, 2018
Messages
3
Reaction score
3
Status
Wrongfully Convicted
Totally in agreement with Patrick.... so to avoid the joker in the pack or the clown
Find a firm, speak to them and let them act on your behalf before attending the interview.
And don't be frightened to ask for an alternative date
 

Roy catchpole

Senior Patron
Verified
Joined
Oct 31, 2018
Messages
249
Reaction score
175
Status
Other
Back on another site - there was often some debate about the quality of "duty solicitors" and rightly so.
For the frightened novice looking to get their free representation it is worth a bit of explanation as to what a police station duty solicitor is...

firstly - they may or may not actually be a solicitor in the sense that most people think, as in they are lawyers who have passed the law society assessments - but they may have zero experience of court work or representing people in any situation other than at police stations.

The reality is that the quality varies dramatically - a majority of them may be a good representative sample of the local solicitor's firms, fulfilling the duty rota and doing a decent enough job with a hope of recruiting a client. Or they may sit and say nothing and not make any useful suggestions or protective statements - or give the wrong advice because they do not know all the implications - for example, the advice to make a "no comment interview"...unlikely to be the best option, and can be the very worst.

Speak to your solicitor about the idea of making a prepared statement, - at any time during the interview - you and the lawyer can decide to stop and make a written statement, as you hear more of the supposed evidence against you...
and though unusual, this can be more than once or twice too.

This is why it is worth speaking to a solicitor who you have heard good things about - and asking for them to be with you at the police station rather than the gamble of someone from the duty rosta.

The main thing is,
having a solicitor there means you can access the material as listed in Chavez's post
and they will stop (if they are any good) the type of heavy handed repetitive questioning that can have the effect of making you believe you may have done something you have forgotten about, rather than being certain that what they are saying you did is just bullshit allegations.

The other thing to try and do - given that you have had this miraculous chance of going to your first police interview informed rather than as a frightened child...
Is remember that this is YOUR interview, not theirs.
Whatever is recorded in this interview will be used in evidence if charges are brought, and so it is very important that you are in control of it and everything said about you.
You may have enjoyed a good relationship with the police in the past - even worked in partnership with them...
if this is a Rape or serious sexual assault allegation - you are up against a determined and unscrupulous enemy.
Mostly these detectives are full on believers in the myth of all men are rapists and no woman ever lies about rape.
So do not ever think of them as being like the friendly bobby who came around your house when you were burgled that time, they are
NOT
YOUR
FRIENDS.

To ensure your comfort you have the right to request breaks to speak to your lawyer and to have drinks of water.
If they are rephrasing a question just to try and pressure you to give a different answer (and they mostly do this, a lot)
You can state on the record that
"You have asked this question already and I have answered it completely, - do you have any new questions?
This can force them to "think", especially if they make the mistake of rephrasing another stupid question you have already answered, in which case you just say it again.
Modern police stations record these interviews on DVDs, including a wide shot of the group of the table (2 detectives, you + solicitor) and a close up of you. If they are made to look stupid while you stay cool calm and collected - this has to be good for you.

Anything from that interview DVD will be deemed admissible in court - though it is more likely that the police will refer to a transcript - (which will be full of dreadful spelling errors if my own is anything to go by). when you get the chance (if charged) then you can get to study this DVD with your lawyer.

Them holding you in a cell is always a possibility - if they decide to arrest with a view to laying down bail conditions.
If you have never been held in a cell, best to be prepared for a long wait - and as you won't have your phone you will need to try and turn it into a challenge to remain in control - because they are after softening you up.

I demanded some food, vegetarian, ( just to make them work harder!) and while it was crap - it gave me a vital sense of having some power and control. I also demanded a phone call - which I didn't get until after my interview, but then I had already been so stupid as to say I didn't want a lawyer as I was entirely innocent. - a mistake that could have cost me.

More to come?
all comments based on your own experiences welcomed!
This is brilliant advice, torn from difficult experience by a winner! Well worth taking very seriously. It could save your life.
 

Patrick

Barman
Staff member
Verified
Joined
Oct 29, 2018
Messages
352
Reaction score
320
Location
Gloucestershire
Status
Acquitted
Find a firm, speak to them and let them act on your behalf before attending the interview.
And don't be frightened to ask for an alternative date
That's a thing the voluntary interview really tests -
"I can't do that date - can we please rearrange it, preferably for when I am not at work..."
"I'm sorry sir, but it needs to be during our detective's working week, is Monday at 4:30pm any good"
"...."
"Sir? - the Monday?"
"How about never - is never good for you?"
:giggle:
 

Mine's a pint

Member
Unverified
Joined
Nov 1, 2018
Messages
1
Reaction score
2
Status
No Further Action
Back on another site - there was often some debate about the quality of "duty solicitors" and rightly so.
For the frightened novice looking to get their free representation it is worth a bit of explanation as to what a police station duty solicitor is...

firstly - they may or may not actually be a solicitor in the sense that most people think, as in they are lawyers who have passed the law society assessments - but they may have zero experience of court work or representing people in any situation other than at police stations.

The reality is that the quality varies dramatically - a majority of them may be a good representative sample of the local solicitor's firms, fulfilling the duty rota and doing a decent enough job with a hope of recruiting a client. Or they may sit and say nothing and not make any useful suggestions or protective statements - or give the wrong advice because they do not know all the implications - for example, the advice to make a "no comment interview"...unlikely to be the best option, and can be the very worst.

Speak to your solicitor about the idea of making a prepared statement, - at any time during the interview - you and the lawyer can decide to stop and make a written statement, as you hear more of the supposed evidence against you...
and though unusual, this can be more than once or twice too.

This is why it is worth speaking to a solicitor who you have heard good things about - and asking for them to be with you at the police station rather than the gamble of someone from the duty rosta.

The main thing is,
having a solicitor there means you can access the material as listed in Chavez's post
and they will stop (if they are any good) the type of heavy handed repetitive questioning that can have the effect of making you believe you may have done something you have forgotten about, rather than being certain that what they are saying you did is just bullshit allegations.

The other thing to try and do - given that you have had this miraculous chance of going to your first police interview informed rather than as a frightened child...
Is remember that this is YOUR interview, not theirs.
Whatever is recorded in this interview will be used in evidence if charges are brought, and so it is very important that you are in control of it and everything said about you.
You may have enjoyed a good relationship with the police in the past - even worked in partnership with them...
if this is a Rape or serious sexual assault allegation - you are up against a determined and unscrupulous enemy.
Mostly these detectives are full on believers in the myth of all men are rapists and no woman ever lies about rape.
So do not ever think of them as being like the friendly bobby who came around your house when you were burgled that time, they are
NOT
YOUR
FRIENDS.

To ensure your comfort you have the right to request breaks to speak to your lawyer and to have drinks of water.
If they are rephrasing a question just to try and pressure you to give a different answer (and they mostly do this, a lot)
You can state on the record that
"You have asked this question already and I have answered it completely, - do you have any new questions?
This can force them to "think", especially if they make the mistake of rephrasing another stupid question you have already answered, in which case you just say it again.
Modern police stations record these interviews on DVDs, including a wide shot of the group of the table (2 detectives, you + solicitor) and a close up of you. If they are made to look stupid while you stay cool calm and collected - this has to be good for you.

Anything from that interview DVD will be deemed admissible in court - though it is more likely that the police will refer to a transcript - (which will be full of dreadful spelling errors if my own is anything to go by). when you get the chance (if charged) then you can get to study this DVD with your lawyer.

Them holding you in a cell is always a possibility - if they decide to arrest with a view to laying down bail conditions.
If you have never been held in a cell, best to be prepared for a long wait - and as you won't have your phone you will need to try and turn it into a challenge to remain in control - because they are after softening you up.

I demanded some food, vegetarian, ( just to make them work harder!) and while it was crap - it gave me a vital sense of having some power and control. I also demanded a phone call - which I didn't get until after my interview, but then I had already been so stupid as to say I didn't want a lawyer as I was entirely innocent. - a mistake that could have cost me.

More to come?
all comments based on your own experiences welcomed!
When I had my voluntary interview I believe I had a competent and interested duty solicitor. However at no point did it enter my head that maybe the voluntary interview was not a good idea and at no stage did my solicitor advise me against it. Maybe legal aid money was a vested interest....It turned out that there was simply no credible evidence; anecdotal, circumstantial or otherwise against me. My point is that being full and frank and above all honest with a Police officer can land you into further enquiries simply because it might potentially create a new lead of enquiry......comments?
 
Last edited by a moderator:

chavez121

Member
Unverified
Joined
Nov 9, 2018
Messages
3
Reaction score
3
Status
Wrongfully Convicted
That has been known to happen but in most cases all they want is for you to say something that can incriminate you... without legal representation
The investigating officer will make you believe you have nothing to worry about. ... far from the truth
 

Patrick

Barman
Staff member
Verified
Joined
Oct 29, 2018
Messages
352
Reaction score
320
Location
Gloucestershire
Status
Acquitted
My point is that being full and frank and above all honest with a Police officer can land you into further enquiries simply because it might potentially create a new lead of enquiry......comments?
I think this reflects why we have such a thing as the no comment interview,
but more deeply it shows that the police are really not after hearing anything to do with the truth from you...
only if there is something you have said, or implied, that they can twist and try and trap you into saying something, anything, - that might even be a blurt out about you were trying to hide a secret affair from your wife... anything that can be turned against you, will be.

this is my point about them being the enemy
but when it comes to no comment interviews - the idea that the judge telling the jury that this is your right, and no inference should be made by the jury due to you exercising that right, counters the powerful impression that you are hiding something -
that is ridiculous.
 

franticwithworry

Regular
Verified
Joined
Nov 1, 2018
Messages
61
Reaction score
62
Status
Family Member
There is also the fact that in spite of being entitled to disclosure before interview, sometimes the police refuse to give anything useful in spite of the most reasoned arguments by the solicitor. This then results in advice to give a 'no comment' interview. It will be interesting to see, if it comes to it, what the reaction is to the exchange 'Why did you give a no comment interview?' 'Because my solicitor advised me to when the police refused to give useful or meaningful disclosure.'
 

Patrick

Barman
Staff member
Verified
Joined
Oct 29, 2018
Messages
352
Reaction score
320
Location
Gloucestershire
Status
Acquitted
There is also the fact that in spite of being entitled to disclosure before interview, sometimes the police refuse to give anything useful in spite of the most reasoned arguments by the solicitor. This then results in advice to give a 'no comment' interview. It will be interesting to see, if it comes to it, what the reaction is to the exchange 'Why did you give a no comment interview?' 'Because my solicitor advised me to when the police refused to give useful or meaningful disclosure.'
Chavez was advised to give a no comment interview - a spectacular backfire in his case, but I don't think it was quite those circumstances - more of a bad solicitor misreading the case and the intent of the police.
 

Roy catchpole

Senior Patron
Verified
Joined
Oct 31, 2018
Messages
249
Reaction score
175
Status
Other
I think this reflects why we have such a thing as the no comment interview,
but more deeply it shows that the police are really not after hearing anything to do with the truth from you...
only if there is something you have said, or implied, that they can twist and try and trap you into saying something, anything, - that might even be a blurt out about you were trying to hide a secret affair from your wife... anything that can be turned against you, will be.

this is my point about them being the enemy
but when it comes to no comment interviews - the idea that the judge telling the jury that this is your right, and no inference should be made by the jury due to you exercising that right, counters the powerful impression that you are hiding something -
that is ridiculous.
That interview can be absolutely key to what happens to you in the future. There are many things and lifestyles that ordinary men pursue every week and all of the time - the police interviewers included. But some of these behaviours, which are perfectly legal, although sometimes finely balanced(!) in relationship terms, can and most certainly will be used against you in a court of law. If you are a respected member of the community and had an affair - you are now guilty of the completely unrelated false allegation you're charged with "If he's done it once, he'll do it again. He deceived his community, he will deceive the jury." If you have occasionally used drugs, then you suddenly become painted as at best an unreliable liar and at worst an undiscovered dealer. Your character is maligned, and the jury can see it. Quite unrelated to the charge in hand, but tending to make you into a guilty felon in front of the jury. The police know this is not really how it is, but their job is to prosecute and get the numbers of 'Guilty' up. As has been said before. THEY ARE NOT YOUR MATES. Be careful what you say. Think before you speak. Fear the worst. Do NOT hope for the best.
 
Last edited:

Roy catchpole

Senior Patron
Verified
Joined
Oct 31, 2018
Messages
249
Reaction score
175
Status
Other
Back on another site - there was often some debate about the quality of "duty solicitors" and rightly so.
For the frightened novice looking to get their free representation it is worth a bit of explanation as to what a police station duty solicitor is...

firstly - they may or may not actually be a solicitor in the sense that most people think, as in they are lawyers who have passed the law society assessments - but they may have zero experience of court work or representing people in any situation other than at police stations.

The reality is that the quality varies dramatically - a majority of them may be a good representative sample of the local solicitor's firms, fulfilling the duty rota and doing a decent enough job with a hope of recruiting a client. Or they may sit and say nothing and not make any useful suggestions or protective statements - or give the wrong advice because they do not know all the implications - for example, the advice to make a "no comment interview"...unlikely to be the best option, and can be the very worst.

Speak to your solicitor about the idea of making a prepared statement, - at any time during the interview - you and the lawyer can decide to stop and make a written statement, as you hear more of the supposed evidence against you...
and though unusual, this can be more than once or twice too.

This is why it is worth speaking to a solicitor who you have heard good things about - and asking for them to be with you at the police station rather than the gamble of someone from the duty rosta.

The main thing is,
having a solicitor there means you can access the material as listed in Chavez's post
and they will stop (if they are any good) the type of heavy handed repetitive questioning that can have the effect of making you believe you may have done something you have forgotten about, rather than being certain that what they are saying you did is just bullshit allegations.

The other thing to try and do - given that you have had this miraculous chance of going to your first police interview informed rather than as a frightened child...
Is remember that this is YOUR interview, not theirs.
Whatever is recorded in this interview will be used in evidence if charges are brought, and so it is very important that you are in control of it and everything said about you.
You may have enjoyed a good relationship with the police in the past - even worked in partnership with them...
if this is a Rape or serious sexual assault allegation - you are up against a determined and unscrupulous enemy.
Mostly these detectives are full on believers in the myth of all men are rapists and no woman ever lies about rape.
So do not ever think of them as being like the friendly bobby who came around your house when you were burgled that time, they are
NOT
YOUR
FRIENDS.

To ensure your comfort you have the right to request breaks to speak to your lawyer and to have drinks of water.
If they are rephrasing a question just to try and pressure you to give a different answer (and they mostly do this, a lot)
You can state on the record that
"You have asked this question already and I have answered it completely, - do you have any new questions?
This can force them to "think", especially if they make the mistake of rephrasing another stupid question you have already answered, in which case you just say it again.
Modern police stations record these interviews on DVDs, including a wide shot of the group of the table (2 detectives, you + solicitor) and a close up of you. If they are made to look stupid while you stay cool calm and collected - this has to be good for you.

Anything from that interview DVD will be deemed admissible in court - though it is more likely that the police will refer to a transcript - (which will be full of dreadful spelling errors if my own is anything to go by). when you get the chance (if charged) then you can get to study this DVD with your lawyer.

Them holding you in a cell is always a possibility - if they decide to arrest with a view to laying down bail conditions.
If you have never been held in a cell, best to be prepared for a long wait - and as you won't have your phone you will need to try and turn it into a challenge to remain in control - because they are after softening you up.

I demanded some food, vegetarian, ( just to make them work harder!) and while it was crap - it gave me a vital sense of having some power and control. I also demanded a phone call - which I didn't get until after my interview, but then I had already been so stupid as to say I didn't want a lawyer as I was entirely innocent. - a mistake that could have cost me.

More to come?
all comments based on your own experiences welcomed!
Good to take notice of this advice. No-one here is paid to get customers for solicitors or to promote anyone for financial gain. This has not been my experience on another site. The experience and knowledge we share with one another here comes from a good heart and because we have all been there. Matt and Patrick can be totally trusted to keep it that way. Personally, I feel it is a great privilege to be admitted to this pub, which is full of decent people. Everyone I've met on here has been A-One. Thanks.<3
 

charley

Member
Verified
Joined
Dec 20, 2018
Messages
17
Reaction score
15
Status
Other
blind and daft. thats me. after speaking to a police officer on the phone and asking what the problem was. demanding an answer.
then being told that it was not urgent. i arranged to meet him the next day at the police station. it was bank holiday and the station
was closed. the officer met me in the street and we went around to the back door. we were the only people there.
he provided me with a class of water explaining that all the tea and sugar was locked away. {no trust in the police station]
then he proceeded to set up the recording device explaining that i was being interviewed under caution. what!
i was only there to find out what the non urgent problem was about.
i did not require a solicitor, why would i? trying to account for my life 40 years ago was a trial in itself.
two hours later.
the officer explained that it would take about 18 months before i would hear any more as they were inundated with this kind of accusations.
most likely it would be dropped.
his advice was to go home and carry on with my life as normal. yea.???

learning the hard way.
regards pete.
 

Patrick

Barman
Staff member
Verified
Joined
Oct 29, 2018
Messages
352
Reaction score
320
Location
Gloucestershire
Status
Acquitted
"Blind and daft"? - not so much -
just that you are from that wide group in society who have never seen the police as the enemy before. It seems to include every member of the various groups of falsely accused I have been involved with, and was a huge awakening for all of us.

You may have shaken them a little with your surprise tactic of insisting they see you sooner rather than later.
And while we always repeat "the police are not your friends" - not all of them (especially at the uniform front line level) are out to get you.

The fact is that the RASSO (Rape and serious sexual offences) units have been the only departments to see a large increase in funding, during the past 8 years when general police funding has been hugely cut.
the people who have been promoted to fill those units are largely the types who want a cushy desk job, off the more dangerous front line - and know how to brown-nose the corrupt bosses. They have been briefed by those bosses on the need to get "results".
("the upper echelons are where corruption is most rife" ~ framed and sacked whistle-blower Police officer).

These are mainly female detectives - or men who have been thoroughly trained to work alongside them and adopted the #falsefeminist ethos,"believe all victims" - which requires them to believe that all rape accusers ARE victims right from the outset...

to defeat this arrangement some police officers have actually maintained a special credibility filter, so when a 40 year old woman comes in and says, "This guy raped me on Valentine's day 1955 wearing a Satanic cloak and singing Gary Barlow hits"
- they take a minute and their filter says,
"Just maybe... this person isn't telling the whole truth"...

Otherwise it would be very hard to explain the massive majority of cases where a rape is reported but it never gets to trial.
Watch the figures this year - a massive boom ( see the welcome announcement thread)
54,000 rape allegations in the year to April 2018 - my bet is that fewer than 6,000 get to court. and of those, fewer than 2000 will be convicted.

Sound logic based on the UK crime survey tells us that half of these rape accusations (about 27,000) are false - as in lies. (many more are dubious and possibly untrue.) It is an epidemic, and you have been caught in the net,
the good news is that this net is rotting and unsound,
and together we will rip it apart.
 
Top