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The 'Inspector' Calls

millroly

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What is your most 'wacko' interaction with the Police.? Here's mine (an incident which happened at my home in May 2017 and I wrote an account that evening on my website blog):

'One thing I have learned, in nearly 3 score years, is that certain ‘unsocial’ behaviours and characteristics cannot be changed or manipulated. The arrogant, the rude and the bombastic all display their same characteristics when it comes to being challenged or even presenting themselves in daily life.

You think you understand, but you don’t, Mr.F”. The 'acting' Inspector's harassing retort was constant and his bullying expressed his irritation with me, as he repeated his sentiment 10 times and more. This was much to the embarrassment of his accompanying junior member of staff, a female PCSO, who sat throughout an uncomfortable cringe worthy diatribe. In presenting his argument, he introduced a fair smattering of malapropisms. I was flummoxed in how I should react. Somewhat looking like someone with constipation (I believe), displaying the harsh face of a defecating man I restrained myself from laughing at his unfortunate delivery of the English language.

You know you are very bitter, Mr.F ”. I slow nodded in agreement as it was the best way to appease someone who was clearly on the attack (who thought he was in control, certainly wanted to take control). I refrained from being sarcastic in answering his statement of the blithering obvious. His nemesis was his presentation; with a failure to show any listening skill. Remaining calm and holding counsel I was polite in listening, reeling from a desire not to belittle him in a war of words, only saying “I hope you give me the opportunity to say my bit, at some point” . I looked at him whilst taking note of his colleagues facial expression and demeanour. Her slight head vibration, pouting of her lips and her widening rolling eyes changed her overall body position from sitting subserviently on the edge of the sofa. I looked upon him in pity, as though he were a child who had not grasped the gravitas of the situation. He, seemingly, wanted to 'get the boot in'.

Although I interjected, he carried on like a runaway train completely out of control; telling me that once someone is accused of a serious crime, ‘all suspects’ even where no evidence is found and are released from an investigation will always be considered as suspects (much to the end of their days). This does support the ‘witch hunt’ argument and sinisterly counters the ‘innocent until proven guilty’ doctrine.

The new recording equipment in the house was not turned on (I must get into the habit of doing this), much a mistake by me. I was caught ‘on the hop’ somewhat shocked to see someone above the rank of constable. I let the two officers into the house in the hope that politeness, with displaying a willingness to listen, would give some amelioration. It was not to be. I went from thoughts of offering them a cup of tea, to such frustration that half way through the visit I said quite calmly “I think it is best if you leave this house”.

The ‘runaway train’ kept going, much ignoring my interjections and him displaying signs of selective deafness. I am not sure why the officers were even there. The senior officer seemed to have a clear intent to control the tone and words in the conversation; giving me a bit of a 'ticking off'. I am not of a stature or mindset to hurl someone out of the front door, but was surely tempted to give it a go. Yet again I was brow beaten; frustrated my eyes welled up and it was a very stressful hour, plus.

Given time I hope this young ‘acting’ inspector, if he wants to progress any debate or opinion, will benefit from grasping some discussion and interpersonal skills. He fell back on ‘his’ interpretation of the law and argued the confusing mechanics of procedures; rather than any spirit of reason, showing no great empathy to my plight.

Claiming knowledge and experience of Autism, he threw into the arena a suggestion that I take up model train track building. It was a bit of a 'M84 flash bang' moment! No doubt he determined that Autism had made me an erstwhile train spotter. My only interest in transport is limited to keeping my car on the road with the purpose of getting from A to B. But, in fairness, I had an overly critical thought towards him, determining that he was a ‘Rugger Bugger’ (a bloke with an obsessive interest in aggressive activities). With no 'significant evidence' (remember that old chestnut?) to support this assertion.'

Odette Sansom Hallowes GC, MBE who suffered at the hands of the Gestapo, was asked in the late eighties during a TV interview, if she ‘had great anger towards her tormentors’. “No” she replied, “Just pity, as they collectively and individually had lost all sense of judgement and morality

PS. The 'acting Inspector' was moved from the local Police station to settle into his new roll and has been re-ranked as a Custody Sergeant in Exeter. I'm not sure if the 're-ranking' was a side ways move for an 'acting inspector' or a demotion. Maybe he had just pissed off enough people, even within the Police service, that they needed to hide him away?
 
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millroly

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Modern day cruelty and abuse comes in many ways. Those who are supposedly given the task of protecting us from cruelty are actively engaged in the processes of torment. My 'hero' is Christopher Jefferies, who was falsely accused of a murder. He has written much about his experience of being in the radar of the Police. He talked about his detainment and the subsequent actions of the Police. "At the time it felt as if the police were deliberately playing a game - promising the ordeal would soon be over and then finding it necessary to prolong the wait. It was a form of psychological torture."
 

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some reading this may still get the impression that this level of idiocy is rare...
that police authorities would surely not promote more than the odd "mistake" -
but the experience of 2 years of forum work covering about 1000 people's input of their stories confirms that this, as detailed above by Roly,
is in fact the norm...

The majority, the large majority, of senior policemen are not only corrupt - but also stupid by comparison with the average A level student. Stupid as in, low IQ and emotional intelligence below the level of an average 17 year old.

It is extremely hard to retain one's coolness, calm and dignity in the face of the powers that hang above you being made up of such Catch-22 grade insanity, but still we must band together to remind ourselves - that we are sane, that for most of us the Kafka's trial element is now past us, and that we can pick up the pieces and make a meaningful life again - despite losing our faith the the institutions that we previously thought held our society together.

here's hoping we can help others discover these hard hitting factors so that we can progress in life under no illusions about where we really stand.
 

millroly

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God forbid! You are not hinting that Police officers are drawn from the ranks of those of 'limited capacity' or 'thick', are you? ;)

I think I remain drawn to Shakespearian writing: 'Thick' which has been commonly used to mean slow-witted or stupid since the turn of the 17th century. Shakespeare used it to good effect in Henry IV, Part. 2, 1600: "Hang him baboon, his wit's as thicke as Tewksbury mustard". Tewksbury mustard was a variety that was made with ground English mustard seeds and horseradish, formed into a ball. It was thick and creamy. When eluding to 'Thick as two short planks', someone is being described as 'Exceedingly thick'.
 
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millroly

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The majority, the large majority, of senior policemen are not only corrupt - but also stupid by comparison with the average A level student. Stupid as in, low IQ and emotional intelligence below the level of an average 17 year old.
I think you missed out 'testosterone driven' between the words low IQ and emotional intelligence!
 

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Funnily enough - Tewkesbury Mustard and its being mentioned by Shakespeare was the answer to a Mastermind question that I got right on the TV just the other week.
About five years ago I worked there for a year as a senior social care manager and found out a lot about its history - (including the decisive 1471 Roses battle and the summary execution of Prince Edward, as part of the utter defeat of Lancaster.)

and yes - the police force attracts (and this comes from a serving police officer, backed by others) those who want "to drive cars fast and bosh down doors" - to be above the law without having to study or work hard... so, thick and criminally inclined.

all experience suggests "Line of Duty" doesn't begin to uncover the thickness and barely scratches at the surface of the corruption.
 

millroly

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In a local BBC interview, Chief Constable Shaun Sawyer of Devon and Cornwall Police, expressed a desire to see PCSO's replaced with "Officers who could drive fast cars and shot guns!" WELCOME to the Wild 'South' West!

The PCC - Alison Hernandez - has very interesting views as well. Some of her comments and actions include : the people in Devon and Cornwall are not happy about the reduction in the number of PCSOs but she does not see the reduction 'as a problem', there has been an inappropriateness of her comments on guns, suggesting we should allow vigilantes to be armed in the event of terrorism, and her taking the post while under investigation for alleged electoral fraud . . . . . . . to name just a few!
 
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franticwithworry

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Robert Peel wanted 'brawn, not brain', apparently. Little has changed.

That said, I have been on the receiving end of great kindness and empathy from one police officer in the midst of all this. It was not lost on me that he was young and uniformed. (Though all police officers are becoming young to me! :)) I so hope it doesn't get knocked out of him, and we mustn't forget that there are good officers among the bad.
 

millroly

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You are lucky. I have yet, to find an officer who actually gives a f£$k, t29s or w%^k! :( Maybe it's just me daring to accuse them of wrong doing, they do not like it.
 

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I'd go along with that.

That said, I do remember the horror expressed by one friend years ago who told me that his son had (unexpectedly) decided to apply to join the police. When he asked him why, son said it was so he could bash people and get away with it and my poor friend wasn't sure if he was serious or joking.

Humans, eh? Far too complicated for their own good. :)
 

millroly

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My brother-in-law talked about a social occasion, he had with his sister and her work chums - she is a senior ranking Police Officer in Dorset. He said he was quite disgusted with her and her behaviour as she regaled, with her colleagues, the times when they 'got the boot in to the offending plebs!' I get the impression that he very rarely speaks with her now.
 

millroly

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In a local BBC interview, Chief Constable Shaun Sawyer of Devon and Cornwall Police, expressed a desire to see PCSO's replaced with "Officers who could drive fast cars and shot guns!" WELCOME to the Wild 'South' West!
Tonight on a 'BBC South West News' Interview, our erstwhile 'Chief ' said "We need at least another 500 officers in Devon." This follows the announcement by BoJo to supply 20,000 more officers on the streets. He said "We have one officer investigating 14 rapes" (So let's wonder what his focus and priority is, when it comes to community policing here in Devon. Anyone ?). Now there's a good emotive issue to present as a 'Political Animal' Chief! It will impress the local 'Daily Mail' readers!

No doubt they will turn to investigating loads more people like me and screw up their lives.
 
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millroly

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Lest we forget! In late 2015, I added a series of articles about Bijan Ebrahimi to my website blog:

The Bijan Ebrahimi murder trial and prosecution of a PCSO and police officer, may start a process of police officers taking the needs of those falsely accused seriously. Bijan sought help from police officers in Bristol, fearful of vigilantes; he was treated by the police as a 'liar and nuisance'. It starts to bring home the polices impotence to support those falsely accused of being paedophiles. Bijan's limited contact with the police was when he was arrested for a 'breach of the peace'. This measure (according to court records) was to enable the police to 'shut him up' and quell his use of police time.

There have been countless reported incidents of vigilantes attacking property and vulnerable isolated people, which in large the aftermath of which demonstrates weak token gesture in investigations and are generally ignored by the courts processes. Leaving the victim of vigilante behaviour in a quandary. We are all aware fundamentally, that on accusation of any related peadophile activity, a 'death warrant' has been 'signed'. Certainly it is unheard of that the police step in to defend the accused individual. If the police themselves make the accusation, then it feeds in to vigilantes acrimony. Actions which some police officers clearly condone.

With all the failings which were revealed to the court, I do hope that the court does at least imprison these officers to send a clear message about how vulnerable a person becomes, when they are accused of being a paedophile. For someone in my position who knows that information about me being put in the public domain, made delinquent by police actions raises the game stakes to high risk of vigilante threat and action. Wishfully, we may see the start in the process of creating a balance and force the police to review their culture of acceptance; that their 'nods and winks' with the lack of taking the falsely accused victim concerns seriously might turn on themselves.

As the police fight their own demons about their past failing, to act in supporting child victims of abuse, this issue will remain on the back burner until sufficient murders and suicide deaths have occurred. In the course of time, maybe not in my lifetime, their will become many prosecutions of individual police officers who through their historic misconduct have allowed death to occur and failed to protect the vulnerable.

Update: 10th February 2016
Yesterday, the sentencing of the two offenders was announced by the a Judge at Bristol Crown Court, The judge said: “I cannot go behind the jury’s verdicts and it is with a heavy heart that in each of your cases I take the view that only a custodial sentence is appropriate."
“It doesn’t seem to me a proper consequence of your wrongdoing that the sentences need be long. You have already suffered greatly. You have already lost your careers and in each of your cases there is genuine justification for mercy." “You must not bear the responsibilities for the wider failings in the police which were beyond your control.”

PC Kevin Duffy was sentenced to 10 months at Bristol crown court on Tuesday, while PCSO Andrew Passmore was jailed for four months. Michael Borrelli QC, for Passmore, said his client was the carer for his elderly mother and stepfather and suffered from low IQ and memory recall.

The pair were convicted of misconduct in a public office after a jury decided they had made criminally serious errors over the case of Bijan Ebrahimi.

Comment: So the judge is apologising for the jurys decision and the fact he needed to send a message to Police services to get their act together? 'Following orders' is not a defence we have allowed for far lesser criminal activity, why are we accepting it now?
A final point, the Defence Counsel pushed a major issue which must ring very loud alarm bells eluding to a PCSO having very low intelligence and servere emotional instability. Can we except the protectors and guardians of our society being, to quote Shakepeare, "as thick as two short planks" and being of a fragile disposition? Is this a true reflection on those encouraged to join police forces? Moreover, the police services entry requirements seem to be so low that anyone who can tie shoe laces and fire a tazer will qualify.

Update: 18th Decemebr 2017
Latest findings in a report about the involvement of the Bristol City Council and the Avon and Somerset Police have been revealed today. Bijan Ebrahimi was beaten to death and set alight on a Bristol estate in 2013, by a group of vigilantes who determined he was a paedophile without any evidence to support their accusations and beliefs. Although the reports main tenet was about racial issues, it also concluded that Avon and Somerset Police and Bristol City Council "repeatedly sided with his abusers".
 
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Matt

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A heartbreaking, even rather scary read Roly, particularly the mention of police officer appearing to suffer from some kind of emotional disorder. With great power comes great responsibility, yet for all of the power that the police hold over society and people's lives in general I find it quite shocking that the standard isn't set higher.

Would we accept a doctor with a low IQ and lack of emotional intelligence? I'd hazard a guess at them being struck off in such circumstances, declared not fit to work. But police officers seem to occupy a unique moral position where we as a society allow the to get away with murder because they are protecting us from the bad guys, trouble is of course, as we all know - it's frequently not the bad guys they're arresting.
 

millroly

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Just remember the writings of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn (the Noble peace winner). "Unlimited power in the hands of those with limited capacity always leads to cruelty."

In my experience they perpetrate cruelty, then when it gets 'hot' (such as me questioning the findings in a report), they just suddenly retire!!
 

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Patrick

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Just remember the writings of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn (the Noble peace winner). "Unlimited power in the hands of those with limited capacity always leads to cruelty."
In my experience they perpetrate cruelty, then when it gets 'hot' (such as me questioning the finding in a report), they just suddenly retire!!
this experience is common Roly - retirement negates the need for any disciplinary process it seems - technically it does not prevent criminal prosecution, but again the bar for policemen in any such case going to charge seems to be set WAY higher than it is for the general public.

That is how the corruption of the CJS works -
lawyers and judges know, that more than anyone, they cannot afford to undermine the "credibility" of the police...their entire livelihoods depend upon police bringing cases and preferably simple prosecution cases being brought.
The recipe for corruption is very plain to see...

so they long ago got into bed with the large scale corruption and assisted, via "undue" process fiddling, to hide away systemic abuses of power.
every now and then a case is SO terrible that they throw an officer or two under the bus.

Anyone who thinks the Stephen Lawrence affair (MacPherson report) actually did anything to get rid of racist bias in the police force must be buying in to the corrupt authorities line - as the Ebrahami case clearly illustrates. - how do you think the police would have behaved if this was a gang of black youths taunting a white guy who was unfairly accused of being a paedophile?

But the judge doesn't mention the issue of race does he? - the judiciary HATE having to talk about it - they might start talking about having had a black friend back at Balliol college once...
 

millroly

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I went to St.Edmunds College (Cambridge) and I can talk about my black friends at Cambridge - the ones whose daddies were tribal chiefs and politicians, had chauffeurs, weekend places in Surrey and spoke with estuary accents! Normal people, as you can imagine! :) Me coming from a family with a 'big estate' - the whole 1/6 of an acre!
 
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