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How many have been accused by the Police alone?

millroly

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For me there was no evidence available, there was no magistrates warrant and there were no witnesses. I was arrested as a result of a full time house sitter, living in a home where I stayed for 8 days a year - principally to maintain my (and the Co-op's) owned house. He was arrested for being in possession of indecent images of children. I was profiled and then my arrest was called for on the basis of suspicion. The decision was made by two officers, one retired before the end of my bail period.

There was never anyone to sue, for false arrest or call for 'come back' from.
 
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Matt

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That's such a difficult situation Millroy, on the one hand they were clearly wrong to arrest you, particularly if it was immediately obvious that there was a password on the computer and/or you evidently didn't have access during the time periods in question.

Dave Evans case sounds similar in some respects. He was arrested for alleged child sex offences arising from a grooming investigation, but it transpired that he wasn't the suspect at all. It was a case of mistaken identity owing to a police officer failing to notice a misplaced full stop in a username. He did manage to successfully sue the force though.

His interview for our We Believe You documentary:

Just for an interesting twist, two police officers from the Staffordshire force came to visit me at my parents home whilst I was on bail at the request of South Wales Police. My ex partner (my complainant) had secretly made multiple reports of me breaching my bail conditions (by contacting her), despite the fact we were both staying together with our daughter. She had later withdrawn her complaint, but SWP were proceeding with the matter regardless.

The two officers from Staffordshire police visited and spoke to myself and my ex partner individually. I remember the female officer's words clearly "South Wales want us to arrest you and drag you back up there, but we've spoken to our Sergeant and he's decided not to authorise it because we can see everything is fine and consensual here".

So they decided not to arrest me and provided some informal advice about applying to the court to have the bail conditions dropped owing to the circumstances.
 

millroly

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Devon & Cornwall Police went from 'absolute' denial (that they had called for my arrest), claiming they had called for a 'witness interview'; to defending their actions for my arrest. My solicitor handed over his file, which included clear evidence (2 emails) that they wanted me to be arrested and interviewed. Also the inquiry into North Yorkshires handling of me, my deprivation of food and denial of drink, exposed evidence on the custody record. The logged Reasons for the arrest being 'arrest called for by Devon & Cornwall Police' and the response in the report from Devon & Cornwall, from the complaint I made against them, said it was 'to secure evidence'. They had used the word 'arrest'. Devon & Cornwall managed to make a right 'buggers muddle' of their inquiry - missed out answering half the complaint and took over 84 days to construe their argument for my arrest, trying to distance themselves. Included in the two page report were five paragraphs (3/4 of a page) about how they had made lawful entry into the house, with a warrant issued 11 days before from a magistrates. At no point did I elude to or contest their lawful entry. Then they quoted their rights to arrest on a suspicion. The 'reasonable' let alone the 'significant' evidence required, they failed to produce!
 
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Patrick

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Roly,

I laughed - perhaps wrongly, at the police justifying the reason for the arrest being the need for arrest... and
I think that your experience there is unusual among the membership, but experience of the police in terms of their behaviour and character - entirely familiar.
- I would suggest that when we get James Barnett in here for a Q& A session thread - that you have some remaining questions drawn up and a simple summary of your case, and where the complaints have gone, ready to discuss - because he might be able to use his experience of going after police forces up and down the country to help you focus on the best way forward...
Personally I think that "writing for England" in any police complaint is a recipe to allow their confusion and inability to think logically off the hook. They have to be honed down questions that focus them on essential answers that they cannot simply waffle past and avoid answering - that is where James's skills and experience come in.

Dave Evans - video above - used a no win no fee lawyer to go after the police for what was an obvious error on their part - and eventually they settled for £100,000 - which might sound a lot to many - but he had lost his marriage, his family, his home and his teaching career, and has now gone to work in Abu Dhabi
 

millroly

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On Christmas day my father died. I will be in a position of having about £25,000 inheritance. I contacted some solicitors for preliminary discussion and suggested that I would pay for some of the legal representation and perhaps they would consider the rest on a 'no win/no fee' arrangement. Both told me that regardless of any financial agreement I was outside of the date (time allowed) of pursuing any claim. Also I needed to be aware that the government had tightened the amount of civil claims that could be made against the Police. With an outcome would most likely not cover my lose of earnings.
 
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millroly

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So much of what Dave Evans said (and I suspect others have said) is close to my heart in dealing with the Police.

My life became more sinister in June 2016, when I was assaulted in the park behind my house by a drunk. I have never been subject to any violence before in my life. My glasses were destroyed and I had a corker of a black eye. Initially the Police ignored my 999 call and no one attended. The following day I wrote an email to the 101 service requesting an incident number to see if I could claim on my household insurance for the glasses. 2 hours later a PCSO appeared and took a statement. He said it was best if it was pursued on a 'local resolution - restorative justice' basis. "If it went to court I would only get a £5 a week payment, if I was lucky. And even then they normally don't pay up". He said that it was in my best interest if I didn't go to court as the defending solicitor might use the 'arrest' to besmirch my character and cause me embarrassment.

Reluctantly I decided to go for the 'restorative justice' option. All that really happened was I was presented with a poorly written letter saying 'sorry', supposedly from my assailant - it could have been written by anyone!

In November 2018, on one of my rare journeys out of the house to get some groceries (other than visiting my father in his nursing home, by car and collecting things from Morrisons), I was pushed from behind. I am not sure what they said as they assaulted me, but 'Fucking . . . " was heard. The new glasses did not take such a bashing, but my face did (image below). My faith in the Police of taking me seriously had completely diminished, so I did not report the incident. I self 'first aided' and at the time my relationship with only locum GP's (as I had no assigned doctor), was so bad that I did not seek any medical intervention. Today, I don't believe I would call the Police even in an emergency.
 

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Matt

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That was awful to read, so very awful millroly, I'm sorry for what you went through. I do have more to say, but typing on a phone so will keep this first reply short. I too don't believe I would call the police in an emergency, the trust has long been diminished.

Just last year, one of my best friend's flatmates was the victim of criminal damage to his car. He knew the perpetrator, a neighbouring family who were local troublemakers, often playing loud music late into the night. He reported the incident to the police, only to be harassed and assaulted the next day.

It transpires that the police had notified the family that a complaint had been made about them, provided my friend's flatmate's name and address, and told them to sort it out between themselves. The police really are a law unto themselves. I second Patrick's suggestion of engaging with James Barnett on here Millroly. He and his team have got a wealth of experience in tackling the police and might be able to suggest an alternative route to get you some justice for what has happened.
 

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Both told me that regardless of any financial agreement I was outside of the date (time allowed) of pursuing any claim. Also I needed to be aware that the government had tightened the amount of civil claims that could be made against the Police. With an outcome would most likely not cover my lose of earnings.
first reaction is - lawyers only know their own area - these two are talking about civil actions.
The reason I am going through the complaints process is not to try and "win the complaint" - it is to pursue two officers for Perversion of the course of justice - a common law criminal charge with no statute of limitations and a maximum sentence of life imprisonment.
James Barnett, who specialises in going after the police on behalf of the falsely accused, knows all the ins and outs and possibilities here.
99% of lawyers do not.
 

millroly

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I am so interested in anyone who can give me help, as a person who has very limited resources and sometimes I feel as though I must be guilty without there being any evidence found.
 

Patrick

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I am so interested in anyone who can give me help, as a person who has very limited resources and sometimes I feel as though I must be guilty without there being any evidence found.
most of us have had that same feeling - "if all these police are saying I did this - perhaps I did when I was drunk and can't remember?"
absence of evidence is never enough to make us feel vindicated.
but when we mix and talk with others who have been through similar things, we start to realise that we are not mad, that we really did not do this stupid shit these arrogant authorities say I did... the weight of numbers - that has made you feel guilty - shifts from their side to ours
once you realise that there were at least 100,000 falsely accused in the UK last year alone.
and the police believed way too many of them.
 
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