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Bail Periods

millroly

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Several interesting articles about bail period have come about. Two years ago the Government changed the rules meaning police forces could only keep a suspect on pre-charge bail for a maximum of 28 days, unless there were exceptional circumstances. Instead of being bailed, suspects are now usually 'released under investigation', a status that is intended to carry less stigma and ought to help speed up the legal process. More than 80 per cent of criminal suspects are now released under investigation rather than on police bail.

But data obtained under the Freedom of Information Act, by the Daily Telegraph, has revealed that in many police forces, suspects are spending even longer in limbo waiting for their case to be resolved. In reality the Police have replaced one shoddy process with another.
 
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millroly

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I was bailed for a collective period of over 3 months, whilst an investigation took place of my 2 computers, media etc, gained from searches of my school residence, my office, car and my home in Devon. The searches by 11 officers (attic to under floor boards) concluded in the seizing of the 2 computers (one brand new sealed in a box with the security tag - opportunistically bought the day before the arrest, to take on my journeys), a mobile phone,and much media. Within 3 weeks of the bail period, my employment was terminated.

In late 2014, I wrote a contribution to the 'Parliamentary Justice Committee' - chaired by Keith Vaz, about the tormenting impact of having my bail period extended and extended (from its original 4 weeks). Others joined in the 'affray' including some high profile celebs contributing. Some of which had been kept on bail for very extended periods. At that time bail could be set using the quota 'pick a number, any number'. So I was quite joyed to see the government put into place the 28 day rule to curtail the excessive abuse of this statute, to those accused of any offence. There was, and potentially still is, a culture and random process of “Show me the man and I’ll show you the crime” - Beria’s infamous boast. In my case the Police started with a blank sheet of paper and tried to create a case. It's my opinion that for many they callously extend the investigation time to a conclusive point of submission, emotional derangement or even suicide (supposedly the accused is always "guilt" laden according the 'No smoke without fire' pedlars). I won that skirmish conclusively, but have not 'won any of the battle!'
 
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Patrick

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I was bailed - under the old rules for a total of a year, before being charged - then another 7 months before trial was due
- and actually if you think the UK is bad, apparently periods of 3 -5 years are common on the continent.

The reality is that the police are woefully under equipped (in the brain and due diligence dept)
and whatever systems are put in place to try and control that - will always fail
because no one in authority (and the majority of the public) can bare to expose the farce that is the UK detective workforce.

It threatens our psyche to know that the law, the backbone of our society, the institution we rely on for a sense of security, is a corrupted and crumbling mess staffed by crooks and incompetent liars. We tend to hide behind ideas of it being "a few bad apples" - so when that myth is fed to us we grab it with both hands...
Sorry to say that all evidence shows bad apples dominate a rotten barrel, but this is something I have slowly learned over the past 3 years and most of it is confirmed by serving or, recently retired, police officers.
 

millroly

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God forbid man! You're not suggesting that the Police are of limited capacity and humanity, are you?
 
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millroly

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The one way the Police escape scrutiny or complaints levied against them, and so many do, is to retire (then they cannot be complained against) and they get massive pension payouts as well!! (With all said, they are all 'Heroes' according to the media).

PS You could substitute an alternative word for 'Heroes' . . . . be careful now . . . .:)
 
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Patrick

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bearing in mind that most can retire on a massive pension in their 40s the likelihood is that "enforced retirement" is the cushiest opt out for a crook in the entire UK workforce.
 
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